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New Jersey Motor Vehicle Points Chart

New Jersey Motor Vehicle Points Lawyer

New Jersey Motor Vehicle Points

N.J.S.A. 39:3–20: Operating constructor vehicle in excess of 45 mph
3 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–14.3: Operating motorized bicycle on a restricted highway
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–14.3d: More than one person on a motorized bicycle
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–35: Failure to yield to pedestrian in crosswalk
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–36: Failure to yield to pedestrian in crosswalk; passing a vehicle yielding to pedestrian in crosswalk
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4– 41: Driving through safety zone
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–52: Racing on highway
5 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–55: Improper action or omission on grades and curves
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–57: Failure to observe direction of officer
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–66: Failure to stop vehicle before crossing sidewalk
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–66.1: Failure to yield to pedestrians or vehicles while entering or leaving highway
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–66.2: Driving on public or private property to avoid a traffic sign or signal
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–71: Operating a motor vehicle on a sidewalk
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–80: Failure to obey direction of officer
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–81: Failure to observe traffic signals
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–82: Failure to keep right
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–82.1: Improper operating of vehicle on divided highway or divider
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–83: Failure to keep right at intersection
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–84: Failure to pass to right of vehicle proceeding in opposite direction
5 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–85: Improper passing on right or off roadway
4 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–85.1: Wrong way on a one-way street
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–86: Improper passing in no passing zone
4 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–87: Failure to yield to overtaking vehicle
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–88: Failure to observe traffic lanes
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–89: Tailgating
5 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–90: Failure to yield at intersection
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–90.1: Failure to use proper entrances to limited access highways
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–91–92: Failure to yield to emergency vehicles
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–96: Reckless driving
5 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–97: Careless driving
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–97a: Destruction of agricultural or recreational property
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–97.1: Slow speed blocking traffic
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–97.2: Driving in an unsafe manner (for third or subsequent offense within five years)
4 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–98: Exceeding maximum speed 1-14 mph over limit
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–98: Exceeding maximum speed 15-29 mph over limit
4 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–98: Exceeding maximum speed 30 mph or more over limit
5 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–105: Failure to stop for traffic light
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–115: Improper turn at traffic light
3 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–119: Failure to stop at flashing red signal
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–122: Failure to stop for police whistle
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–123: Improper right or left turn
3 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–124: Improper turn from approved turning course
3 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–125: Improper U-Turn
3 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–126: Failure to give proper signal
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–127: Improper backing or turning in street
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–127.1: Improper crossing of railroad grade crossing
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–127.2: Improper crossing of bridge
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–128: Improper crossing of railroad grade crossing by certain vehicles
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–128.1: Improper passing of school bus
5 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–128.4: Improper passing of frozen dessert truck
4 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–129: Leaving the scene of an accident –no personal injury
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4-129: Leaving the scene of an accident – personal injury
8 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–144: Failure to observe stop or yield signs
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:5C–1: Racing on highway
5 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:5D–4: Moving violation committed out-of-state
2 Points

The Sloan Law Firm – New Jersey Motor Vehicle Points Attorney

The Sloan Law Firm handles traffic ticket cases that involve motor vehicle points in Union County, Morris County, Somerset County, Essex County, Middlesex County and throughout New Jersey.  If you have been charged with a traffic violation that involves motor vehicle points, the Sloan Law Firm will fight aggressively to reduce the amount of point or eliminate the points altogether through plea negotiations with the prosecutor.  For a free consultation, call (908) 358-2938.

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How to Fight a Traffic Ticket in NJ?

Moving Violation Lawyer Union County NJ

How to Fight a Traffic Ticket in NJ?

Hundreds of thousands of traffic tickets are issued in New Jersey every year.  According to NJ.com, over 175,000 speeding tickets, alone, were issued in New Jersey last year.  Of those, approximately 28,000 were written on the Garden State Parkway, the New Jersey Turnpike and other New Jersey toll roadways.  The others were written on non-toll roads.  For those of us that have received a ticket for speeding or some  other traffic infraction and are not guilty of it, the ensuing question becomes – How to fight a traffic ticket in NJ?

Consider Hiring a New Jersey Traffic Ticket Attorney

If you intend to fight a traffic ticket in New Jersey, it is important to retain an experienced New Jersey traffic ticket attorney.  Fighting a parking ticket is one thing.  Fighting a traffic ticket on your own is not advisable.  Most people are unfamiliar with the specific pertaining to any one particular traffic law.  Being unfamiliar with the law is not going to benefit you at trial or when discussing the matter with the prosecutor.  Those that educate themselves on the law may nonetheless misinterpret it or fail to read the law in conjunction with other pertinent statutes.  Even those totally familiar with all of the traffic laws in New Jersey, it can be unwise to fight the ticket on your own.  Fighting a traffic ticket may require a trial.  At trial, you must be familiar with the Rules of the Court and the Rules of Evidence in New Jersey in addition to the law.  For example, the state may attempt to admit evidence that is objectionable.  If no objection is made, it may be admitted as evidence by the judge.   An experienced New Jersey traffic lawyer will know when to object to improper testimony.   For these reasons, it is important for anyone looking to fight a traffic ticket in NJ to hire a New Jersey traffic ticket attorney.

Don’t Lie

You have the right to remain silent.  You do not have the right to make up things.  Lying to either the police, the prosecutor or the court are obviously very bad ideas. In fact, lying under oath to the court is a serious criminal offense.  But, even lying to your own attorney is not a good idea.  It can jeopardize the whole case.  Prosecutors handle thousands of traffic tickets every year.  A lot of the defendants proclaim their innocence before the prosecutor that later prove to be guilty.  Prosecutor may therefore be skeptical if you proclaim your innocence – even if you truly are.  And, if you tell your own attorney something that he or she relied upon when discussing your case with the prosecutor and the prosecutor is able to disprove it, the chances of getting the traffic ticket dismissed by the state become slim to none.  Even if it is only a minor fact, the prosecutor may be reluctant to hear anymore of  your side of the story and just assume that nothing about your side of the story is true.

Go to Court

You must go to court in order to fight a traffic ticket in NJ.  In New Jersey, traffic infractions are handled in municipal court.  In court, you will be able to plead your innocence while conferencing the case with the prosecutor.  The conference may result in a plea agreement that downgrades the offense.  If that fails, you will be able to take the matter before the judge at a trial.  Generally speaking, there are no jury trials for traffic tickets in New Jersey.  At trial, the burden is on the state to prove the case against you beyond a reasonable doubt.

Present Evidence

Any evidence of your innocence is obviously necessary to present to your own attorney and may be necessary to present to the prosecutor and the judge.  For example, if the traffic ticket states the name of the defendant as “John A. Smith” and your name is “John B. Smith” and the address on the ticket is incorrect and/or the birth date, then you would want to bring your driver’s license with you to court to prove that the wrong person was issued the traffic summons.

The Sloan Law Firm handles traffic ticket cases in Union County, Middlesex County, Morris County, Somerset County and throughout New Jersey.  If you have received a traffic ticket in New Jersey that you are interested in fighting, you can reach the Sloan Law Firm at (908) 358-2938.  The initial consultation is always free.