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New Jersey Motor Vehicle Points Chart

New Jersey Motor Vehicle Points Lawyer

New Jersey Motor Vehicle Points

N.J.S.A. 39:3–20: Operating constructor vehicle in excess of 45 mph
3 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–14.3: Operating motorized bicycle on a restricted highway
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–14.3d: More than one person on a motorized bicycle
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–35: Failure to yield to pedestrian in crosswalk
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–36: Failure to yield to pedestrian in crosswalk; passing a vehicle yielding to pedestrian in crosswalk
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4– 41: Driving through safety zone
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–52: Racing on highway
5 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–55: Improper action or omission on grades and curves
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–57: Failure to observe direction of officer
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–66: Failure to stop vehicle before crossing sidewalk
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–66.1: Failure to yield to pedestrians or vehicles while entering or leaving highway
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–66.2: Driving on public or private property to avoid a traffic sign or signal
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–71: Operating a motor vehicle on a sidewalk
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–80: Failure to obey direction of officer
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–81: Failure to observe traffic signals
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–82: Failure to keep right
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–82.1: Improper operating of vehicle on divided highway or divider
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–83: Failure to keep right at intersection
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–84: Failure to pass to right of vehicle proceeding in opposite direction
5 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–85: Improper passing on right or off roadway
4 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–85.1: Wrong way on a one-way street
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–86: Improper passing in no passing zone
4 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–87: Failure to yield to overtaking vehicle
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–88: Failure to observe traffic lanes
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–89: Tailgating
5 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–90: Failure to yield at intersection
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–90.1: Failure to use proper entrances to limited access highways
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–91–92: Failure to yield to emergency vehicles
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–96: Reckless driving
5 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–97: Careless driving
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–97a: Destruction of agricultural or recreational property
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–97.1: Slow speed blocking traffic
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–97.2: Driving in an unsafe manner (for third or subsequent offense within five years)
4 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–98: Exceeding maximum speed 1-14 mph over limit
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–98: Exceeding maximum speed 15-29 mph over limit
4 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–98: Exceeding maximum speed 30 mph or more over limit
5 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–105: Failure to stop for traffic light
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–115: Improper turn at traffic light
3 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–119: Failure to stop at flashing red signal
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–122: Failure to stop for police whistle
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–123: Improper right or left turn
3 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–124: Improper turn from approved turning course
3 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–125: Improper U-Turn
3 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–126: Failure to give proper signal
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–127: Improper backing or turning in street
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–127.1: Improper crossing of railroad grade crossing
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–127.2: Improper crossing of bridge
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–128: Improper crossing of railroad grade crossing by certain vehicles
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–128.1: Improper passing of school bus
5 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–128.4: Improper passing of frozen dessert truck
4 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–129: Leaving the scene of an accident –no personal injury
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4-129: Leaving the scene of an accident – personal injury
8 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:4–144: Failure to observe stop or yield signs
2 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:5C–1: Racing on highway
5 Points

N.J.S.A. 39:5D–4: Moving violation committed out-of-state
2 Points

The Sloan Law Firm – New Jersey Motor Vehicle Points Attorney

The Sloan Law Firm handles traffic ticket cases that involve motor vehicle points in Union County, Morris County, Somerset County, Essex County, Middlesex County and throughout New Jersey.  If you have been charged with a traffic violation that involves motor vehicle points, the Sloan Law Firm will fight aggressively to reduce the amount of point or eliminate the points altogether through plea negotiations with the prosecutor.  For a free consultation, call (908) 358-2938.

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Phone Number, Website, Contact Information & Guide to Middlesex County, NJ Municipal Courts

Middlesex County NJ Municipal Court

What are the locations and phone numbers for the Municipal Courts in Middlesex County, NJ?

Carteret Municipal Court
230 Roosevelt Avenue
Carteret, NJ 07008
Phone: (732) 541-3900
Web: http://www.ci.carteret.nj.us/

Cranbury Municipal Court
(Shared with Plainsboro)
641 Plainsboro Road
Plainsboro, NJ 08536
Phone: (609) 799-0863
Web: https://www.plainsboronj.com/170/Municipal-Court

Dunellen Municipal Court
355 North Avenue
Dunellen, NJ 08812
Phone: (732) 968-3400
Web: http://dunellen-nj.gov/departments/municipal_court/index.php#.Wx_Qk_ZFzp0

East Brunswick Municipal Court
1 Civic Center Drive
East Brunswick, NJ 08816
Phone: (732) 390-6850
Web: https://www.eastbrunswick.org/content/202/275/default.aspx

Edison Municipal Court
100 Municipal Boulevard
Edison, NJ 08817
Phone: (732) 248-7328
Web: http://www.edisonnj.org/departments/municipal_court/index.php

Helmetta Municipal Court
51 Main Street
Helmetta, NJ 08828
Phone: (732) 521-1757
Web: http://www.helmettaboro.com/Cit-e-Access/webpage.cfm?TID=102&TPID=10877

Highland Park Municipal Court
221 South 5th Avenue
Highland Park, NJ 08904
Phone: (732) 777-6010
Web: http://www.hpboro.com/index.aspx?NID=130

Jamesburg Municipal Court
131 Perrineville Road
Jamesburg, NJ 08831
Phone: (732) 521-0614
Web: http://www.jamesburgborough.org/court.html

Metuchen Municipal Court
500 Main Street
Metuchen, NJ 08840
Phone: (732) 632-8505
Web: http://www.metuchennj.org/metnj/DEPARTMENTS/Court/

Middlesex Municipal Court
1200 Mountain Avenue
Middlesex, NJ 08846
Phone: (732) 356.4644
Web: http://www.middlesexboro-nj.gov/index.php/departments/courts

Milltown Municipal Court
39 Washington Avenue
Milltown, NJ 08850
Phone: (732) 828-2100
Web: http://www.milltownnj.org/court/

Monroe Municipal Court
1 Municipal Plaza
Monroe Township, NJ 08831
Phone: (732) 521-4020
Web: http://www.monroetwp.com/court.cfm

New Brunswick Municipal Court
25 Kirkpatrick Street
New Brunswick, NJ 08901
Phone: (732) 745-5089
Web: http://thecityofnewbrunswick.org/municipal-court/

North Brunswick Municipal Court
710 Hermann Road
North Brunswick Township, NJ 08902
Phone: (732) 247-0922
Web: http://www.northbrunswicknj.gov/departments/court

Old Bridge Municipal Court
1 Old Bridge Plaza
Old Bridge, NJ 08857
Phone: (732) 721-5600
Web: http://www.oldbridge.com/court

Perth Amboy Municipal Court
361 New Brunswick Avenue
Perth Amboy, NJ 08861
Phone: (732) 442-6011
Web: http://ci.perthamboy.nj.us/municipal-court-information.html

Piscataway Municipal Court
555 Sidney Road
Piscataway Township, NJ 08854
Phone: (732) 562-2330
Web: http://www.piscatawaynj.org/mun_court/municipal-court

Plainsboro Municipal Court
(Shared with Cranbury)
641 Plainsboro Road
Plainsboro, NJ 08536
Phone: (609) 799-0863
Web: https://www.plainsboronj.com/170/Municipal-Court

Sayreville Municipal Court
1000 Main Street
Sayreville, NJ 08872
Phone: (732) 525-5446
Web: http://sayrevillepolice.org/court/

South Amboy Municipal Court
140 North Broadway Street
South Amboy, NJ 08879
Phone: (732) 525-5929
Web: http://www.southamboynj.gov/Departments/court

South Brunswick Municipal Court
540 Ridge Road
Monmouth Junction, NJ 08852
Phone: (732) 823-3963
Web: http://www.southbrunswicknj.gov/departments/court

South Plainfield Municipal Court
2480 Plainfield Avenue
South Plainfield, NJ 07080
Phone: (908) 226-7651
Web: http://www.southplainfieldnj.com/spnj/Court/

South River Municipal Court
61 Main Street
South River, NJ 08882
(732) 257-1233
Web: http://www.southrivernj.org/municipal_court_main.html

Spotswood Municipal Court
77 Summerhill Road
Spotswood, NJ 08884
Phone: (732) 251-0700
Web: http://www.spotswoodboro.com/court.html

Woodbridge Municipal Court
1 Main Street
Woodbridge, NJ 07095
Phone: (732) 636-6430
Web: https://www.twp.woodbridge.nj.us/267/Municipal-Court

What is Handled by a Municipal Court in Middlesex County?

In New Jersey Municipal Courts handle matters such as traffic tickets (including DUI), town ordinance violations and disorderly persons offenses. Disorderly persons offenses are sometimes referred to as misdemeanors.

What Types of Criminal Offenses Are Handled in the Middlesex County Municipal Courts?

Common disorderly persons offenses that are handled in the Middlesex County municipal courts include:
• Shoplifting
• Simple Assault
• Harassment
• Marijuana Possession
• Drug Paraphernalia
• Disorderly Conduct
• Underage Drinking
• Public Intoxication
• Loitering
• Destruction of Property
• Resisting Arrest

Many municipal courts have court only once a week. When people go to court, there is usually a full calendar. Busier towns have court more than once a week. There is no set rule for how many times a municipal court must meet.

Municipal Court Personnel

In any court session, you will certainly see the municipal court judge. Municipal Court judges are usually appointed by the town mayor, which is why the municipal court judge changes from time to time. It does not mean that the municipal court judge is doing a bad job. Most of the time, it has to do with politics.

Aside from the judge, you may see the town prosecutor. Because of the heavy case load, the prosecutor is usually in his or her office negotiating plea agreements with various defendants. Occasionally, the judge will require an explanation from the prosecutor as to a particular plea agreement and then the prosecutor will appear. The prosecutor will also be there for any trial.

Every town has one or more public defenders as well. In Middlesex County municipal courts, public defenders are available to those that are charged with a criminal offense or serious traffic infraction. In addition, the defendant must qualify financially. If you qualify for the public defender, the cost is $200. Like the prosecutor, public defenders usually have very heavy caseloads as well.

Usually, you will also see private criminal defense attorneys. Unlike the public defender, the private criminal defense lawyer is usually there on behalf of one client. His or her time and efforts are devoted completely towards one client. Private attorney cases are usually handled first.

Aside from the lawyers, you will probably also notice:
• Court administrators
• Court clerks
• Police officers
• Interpreters
• Violation bureau clerks

How Does a Municipal Court Session Function Procedurally?

It is really up to the judge to determine how he or she wants to handle the court session. Generally speaking, first appearances are handled first because they take the least amount of time. First appearances are for defendants to hear the charges against them and to enter an initial plea of guilty or not guilty. You may hear on the cable news about a not guilty plea from a defendant that appears to be obviously guilty. It is important to point out that this is an initial plea and not guilty plea is done initially many times so that the defendant can obtain a lawyer. Judges are very reluctant to put through a guilty plea without a lawyer present for the defendant. After you enter your first appearance in municipal court, the court will schedule your case for either a trial or a conference. Whether the matter is listed for trial or a conference usually depends on the nature of the charge.

After first appearances are out of the way, the judge will typically take plea agreements. Plea agreements are relatively quick but usually take longer than first appearances. Plea agreements are generally the result of a conference between the prosecutor and the criminal defense attorney.

Trials are always handled last. They take the most amount of time and it allows the judge to get through everyone else’s case so that they are not waiting around for the trial to end just to enter a not guilty plea or put through a plea agreement.

Can I Pay My Traffic Ticket Online?

Parking tickets and some traffic tickets can be paid online. Some traffic tickets require a court appearance. The ticket usually has a boxed checked off that will notify you as to whether or not a court appearance is required.

Pay Your Traffic Ticket Online Here

Middlesex County NJ Criminal Defense Lawyer – (908) 358-2938

The Sloan Law Firm aggressively defends clients dealing with criminal charges and traffic infractions in every Middlesex County municipal court and throughout New Jersey. If you have received a summons for a traffic ticket or a criminal offense and would like to speak with a Middlesex County NJ Municipal Court Attorney, call (908) 358-2938. The initial consultation is free.

The firm serves clients in: Carteret, Cranbury, Dunellen, East Brunswick, Edison, Helmetta, Highland Park, Jamesburg, Metuchen, Middlesex, Milltown, Monroe, New Brunswick, North Brunswick, Old Bridge, Perth Amboy, Piscataway, Plainsboro, Sayreville, South Amboy, South Brunswick, South Plainfield, South River, Spotswood, Woodbridge and throughout Middlesex County.

Thank you for reading.

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Overview: Morris County NJ Municipal Court System

Morris County NJ Municipal Court System Lawyer

Morris County NJ Municipal Court System

In Morris County and throughout New Jersey, Municipal Courts handle matters such as traffic tickets (including DUI), town ordinance violations and disorderly persons offenses.  Disorderly persons offenses are sometimes referred to as misdemeanors.

Where are the Municipal Courts in Morris County, New Jersey located?

Boonton Municipal Court
(Shared with Parsippany-Troy Hills)
3333 Route 46 East
Parsippany, NJ 07054
Phone: (973) 263-4290 or 4291
Web: https://www.boonton.org/163/Court

Boonton Township Municipal Court
155 Powerville Road
Boonton Township, NJ 07005
Phone: Phone: (973) 402-4006
Web: https://www.boontontownship.com/municipal-court

Butler Municipal Court
1 Ace Road
Butler NJ 0740
Phone: (973) 838-0559
Web: http://www.butlerborough.com/Cit-e-Access/webpage.cfm?TID=19&TPID=3600

Chatham Borough Municipal Court
(Shared with Chatham Township, Harding, Madison and Morris)
Hartley Dodge Building
50 Kings Road
Madison, NJ 07940
Phone: (973) 593-3026
Web: http://chathamborough.org/chatham/Government/Municipal%20Court/

Chatham Township Municipal Court
(Shared with Chatham Borough, Harding, Madison and Morris)
Hartley Dodge Building
50 Kings Road
Madison, NJ 07940
Phone: (973) 593-3026
Web: http://www.chathamtownship-nj.gov/departments/court

Chester Borough Municipal Court
(Shared with Mendham Borough)
50 North Road
Chester, NJ 07930
Phone: (908) 879-3660 ext. 2126
Web: http://chesterborough.org/departments/municipal-court/

Chester Township Municipal Court
(Shared with Mendham Township)
1 Parker Road
Chester, NJ 07930
Phone: (908) 879-5100 ext. 816
Web: https://chestertownship.org/departments/municipal-court-violations/

Denville Township Municipal Court
(Shared with Mountain Lakes)
1 St. Mary’s Place
Denville, NJ 07834
Phone: (973) 625-8300
Web: http://www.denvillenj.org/departments/municipal_court.php

Dover Municipal Court
(Shared with Mine Hill and Victory Gardens)
37 North Sussex Street
Dover, NJ 07801
Phone: (973) 366-2200
Web: http://www.dover.nj.us/Cit-e-Access/webpage.cfm?TID=17&TPID=6267

East Hanover Township Municipal Court
(Shared with Hanover)
1000 Route 10 West
Whippany, NJ 07981
Phone: (973) 428-2519
Web: http://www.easthanovertownship.com/departments/court.htm

Florham Park Municipal Court
111 Ridgedale Avenue
Florham Park, NJ 07932
Phone: (973) 410-5324
Web: http://www.fpboro.net/departments/municipal-court/

Hanover Township Municipal Court
(Shared with East Hanover)
1000 Route 10 West
Whippany, NJ 07981
Phone: (973) 428-2519
Web: http://www.hanovertownship.com/Departments/MunicipalCourt/CourtInformation.aspx

Harding Township Municipal Court
(Shared with Chatham Borough, Chatham Township, Madison and Morris)
Hartley Dodge Building
50 Kings Road
Madison, NJ 07940
Phone: (973) 593-3026
Web: http://www.hardingnj.org/content/1068/178/default.aspx

Jefferson Township Municipal Court
1033 Weldon Road
Lake Hopatcong, NJ 07849
Phone: (973) 208-6129
Web: http://www.jeffersontownship.net/Cit-e-Access/webpage.cfm?TID=4&TPID=138

Kinnelon Municipal Court
130 Kinnelon Road
Kinnelon, NJ 07405
Phone: (973) 838-7644
Web: http://www.kinnelonboro.org/municipal-court-7/

Lincoln Park Municipal Court
34 Chapel Hill Road
Lincoln Park, NJ 07035
Phone: (973) 694-6100 ext. 2067
Web: http://www.lincolnpark.org/134/Municipal-Court

Long Hill Township Municipal Court
915 Valley Road
Gillette, NJ 07933
Phone: (908) 647-8000
Web: http://longhillnj.gov/court.html

Madison Municipal Court
(Shared with Chatham Borough, Chatham Township, Harding and Morris)
Hartley Dodge Memorial
50 Kings Road
Madison, NJ 07940
Phone: (973) 593-3026
Web: http://www.rosenet.org/directory.aspx?did=14

Mendham Borough Municipal Court
(Shared with Chester Borough)
50 North Road
Chester, NJ 07930
Phone: (908) 879-3660 Ext.2126
Web: http://www.mendhamnj.org/Cit-e-Access/webpage.cfm?TID=94&TPID=14685

Mendham Township Municipal Court
(Shared with Chester Township)
1 Parker Rd
Chester, NJ 07930
Phone: (908) 879-5100 ext. 816
Web: http://www.mendhamtownship.org/Cit-e-Access/webpage.cfm?TID=77&TPID=10251

Mine Hill Township Municipal Court
(Shared with Dover and Victory Gardens)
37 North Sussex Street
Dover, NJ 07801
Phone: (973) 366-2200
Web: http://minehill.com/

Montville Municipal Court
360 Route 202, Suite 2
Montville, NJ 07045
Phone: (973) 335-1022
Web: http://montvillenj.org/183/Municipal-Court

Morris Plains Municipal Court
531 Speedwell Avenue, 2nd Floor
Morris Plains, NJ 07950
Phone: (973) 538-4019 ext. 206
Web: http://www.morrisplainsboro.org/directory/town-directory

Morris Township Municipal Court
(Shared with Chatham Township, Chatham Borough, Harding and Madison)
Hartley Dodge Building
50 Kings Road
Madison, NJ 07940
Phone: (973) 593-3026
Web: http://www.morristwp.com/126/Municipal-CourtJoint-Municipal-Court

Morristown Municipal Court
200 South Street
Morristown, NJ 07960
Phone: (973) 292-6687
Web: https://www.townofmorristown.org/index.asp?Type=B_BASIC&SEC=6A7FF0EE-988B-47CB-9996-313E57DBFE34

Mount Arlington Municipal Court
419 Howard Boulevard
Mount Arlington, NJ 07856
Phone: (973) 398-6832
Web: https://mountarlingtonnj.org/court/

Mount Olive Township Municipal Court
(Shared with Netcong)
204 Flanders-Drakestown Road
Budd Lake, N.J. 07828
Phone: (973) 691-0900
Web: http://mountolivetownship.com/index.php/departments/municipal-court

Mountain Lakes Municipal Court
(Shared with Denville)
1 St. Mary’s Place
Denville, NJ 07834
Phone: (973) 625-8300
Web: https://mtnlakes.org/departments/municipal-court/

Netcong Municipal Court
(Shared with Mount Olive)
204 Flanders-Drakestown Road
Budd Lake, NJ 07828
Phone: (973) 691-0900
Web: http://netcong.org/municipal-court/

Parsippany-Troy Hills Township Municipal Court
(Shared with Boonton)
3333 Route 46 East
Parsippany, NJ 07054
Phone: (973) 263-4290
Web: http://www.parsippany.net/Departments/Municipal-Court/

Pequannock Township Municipal Court
530 Newark-Pompton Turnpike, 2nd Floor
Pompton Plains, NJ 07444
Phone: (973) 835-5700 ext.114
Web: http://www.peqtwp.org/Cit-e-Access/webpage.cfm?TID=60&TPID=6293

Randolph Municipal Court
502 Millbrook Avenue
Randolph, NJ 07869
Phone: (973) 989-7054
Web: http://www.randolphnj.org/government/municipal_court

Riverdale Municipal Court
91 Newark-Pompton Turnpike
Riverdale, NJ 07457
Phone: (973) 835-1013
Web: https://www.riverdalenj.gov/riverdale-municipal-court

Rockaway Borough Municipal Court
(Shared with Boonton and Parsippany-Troy Hills)
3333 Route 46 East
Parsippany, NJ 07054
Phone: (973) 263-4290
Web: http://rockawayboropd.org/MunicipalCourt.html

Rockaway Township Municipal Court
65 Mount Hope Road
Rockaway, NJ 07866
Phone: (973) 627-9000
Web: http://www.rockawaytownship.org/186/Court

Roxbury Township Municipal Court
1715 Route 46 West
Ledgewood, NJ 07852
Phone: (973) 448-2033
Web: http://www.roxburynj.us/11/Municipal-Court

Victory Gardens Municipal Court
(Shared with Dover and Mine Hill)
37 North Sussex Street
Dover, NJ 07801
Phone: (973) 366-2200
Web: http://victorygardensnj.gov/court.html

Washington Township Municipal Court
43 Schooley’s Mountain Road
Long Valley, NJ 07853
Phone: (908) 876-3852
Web: http://wtmorris.org/index.php/departments/municipal-court.html

Wharton Municipal Court
(Shared with Mount Arlington)
419 Howard Boulevard
Mount Arlington, NJ 07856
Phone: (973) 398-6832
Web: http://whartonnj.com/

What Kinds of Criminal Offenses Are Handled in the Morris County Municipal Courts?

Criminal offenses include:

• Shoplifting
• Simple Assault
• Harassment
• Marijuana Possession
• Drug Paraphernalia
• Disorderly Conduct
• Underage Drinking
• Public Intoxication
• Loitering
• Destruction of Property
• Resisting Arrest

Many municipal courts have court only once a week. When people go to court, there is usually a full calendar. Busier towns have court more than once a week. There is no set rule for how many times a municipal court must meet.

Who Works in Municipal Courts?

In any court session, you will certainly see the municipal court judge. Municipal Court judges are usually appointed by the town mayor, which is why the municipal court judge changes from time to time. It does not mean that the municipal court judge is doing a bad job. Most of the time, it has to do with politics.

Aside from the judge, you may see the town prosecutor. Because of the heavy caseload, the prosecutor is usually in his or her office negotiating plea agreements with various defendants. Occasionally, the judge will require an explanation from the prosecutor as to a particular plea agreement and then the prosecutor will appear. The prosecutor will also be there for any trial.

Every town has one or more public defenders as well. In Morris County municipal courts, public defenders are available to those that are charged with a criminal offense or serious traffic infraction. In addition, the defendant must qualify financially. If you qualify for the public defender, the cost is $200. Like the prosecutor, public defenders usually have very heavy caseloads as well.

Usually, you will also see private criminal defense attorneys. Unlike the public defender, the private criminal defense lawyer is usually there on behalf of one client. His or her time and efforts are devoted completely towards one client. Private attorney cases are usually handled first.

Aside from the lawyers, you will probably also notice

• Court administrators
• Court clerks
• Police officers
• Interpreters
• Violation bureau clerks

How Does a Municipal Court Session Work?

It is really up to the judge to determine how he or she wants to handle the court session. Generally speaking, first appearances are handled first because they take the least amount of time. First appearances are for defendants to hear the charges against them and to enter an initial plea of guilty or not guilty. You may hear on the cable news about a not guilty plea from a defendant that appears to be obviously guilty. It is important to point out that this is an initial plea and not guilty plea is done initially many times so that the defendant can obtain a lawyer. Judges are very reluctant to put through a guilty plea without a lawyer present for the defendant. After you enter your first appearance in municipal court, the court will schedule your case for either a trial or a conference. Whether the matter is listed for trial or a conference usually depends on the nature of the charge.

After first appearances are out of the way, the judge will typically take plea agreements. Plea agreements are relatively quick but usually take longer than first appearances. Plea agreements are generally the result of a conference between the prosecutor and the criminal defense attorney.

Trials are always handled last. They take the most amount of time and it allows the judge to get through everyone else’s case so that they are not waiting around for the trial to end just to enter a not guilty plea or put through a plea agreement.

Can I Pay My Traffic Ticket Online?

Parking tickets and some traffic tickets can be paid online. Some traffic tickets require a court appearance. The ticket usually has a boxed checked off that will notify you as to whether or not a court appearance is required.

Pay Your Traffic Ticket Online Here

Morris County NJ Criminal Defense Lawyer – (908) 358-2938

The Sloan Law Firm aggressively defends clients dealing with criminal charges and traffic infractions in every Morris County municipal court and throughout New Jersey. If you have received a summons for a traffic ticket or a criminal offense and would like to speak with a Morris County NJ Municipal Court Attorney, call (908) 358-2938. The initial consultation is free.

The firm serves clients in: Boonton, Butler, Chatham, Chester, Denville, Dover, East Hanover, Florham Park, Hanover, Harding, Jefferson, Kinnelon, Lincoln Park, Long Hill, Madison, Mendham, Mine Hill, Montville, Morris Plains, Morris Township, Morristown, Mount Arlington, Mount Olive, Mountain Lakes, Netcong, Parsippany-Troy Hills, Randolph , Rockaway Borough, Roxbury, Victory Gardens, Washington Township, Wharton and throughout Morris County.

Thank you for reading.

Posted on

How to Fight a Traffic Ticket in NJ?

Moving Violation Lawyer Union County NJ

How to Fight a Traffic Ticket in NJ?

Hundreds of thousands of traffic tickets are issued in New Jersey every year.  According to NJ.com, over 175,000 speeding tickets, alone, were issued in New Jersey last year.  Of those, approximately 28,000 were written on the Garden State Parkway, the New Jersey Turnpike and other New Jersey toll roadways.  The others were written on non-toll roads.  For those of us that have received a ticket for speeding or some  other traffic infraction and are not guilty of it, the ensuing question becomes – How to fight a traffic ticket in NJ?

Consider Hiring a New Jersey Traffic Ticket Attorney

If you intend to fight a traffic ticket in New Jersey, it is important to retain an experienced New Jersey traffic ticket attorney.  Fighting a parking ticket is one thing.  Fighting a traffic ticket on your own is not advisable.  Most people are unfamiliar with the specific pertaining to any one particular traffic law.  Being unfamiliar with the law is not going to benefit you at trial or when discussing the matter with the prosecutor.  Those that educate themselves on the law may nonetheless misinterpret it or fail to read the law in conjunction with other pertinent statutes.  Even those totally familiar with all of the traffic laws in New Jersey, it can be unwise to fight the ticket on your own.  Fighting a traffic ticket may require a trial.  At trial, you must be familiar with the Rules of the Court and the Rules of Evidence in New Jersey in addition to the law.  For example, the state may attempt to admit evidence that is objectionable.  If no objection is made, it may be admitted as evidence by the judge.   An experienced New Jersey traffic lawyer will know when to object to improper testimony.   For these reasons, it is important for anyone looking to fight a traffic ticket in NJ to hire a New Jersey traffic ticket attorney.

Don’t Lie

You have the right to remain silent.  You do not have the right to make up things.  Lying to either the police, the prosecutor or the court are obviously very bad ideas. In fact, lying under oath to the court is a serious criminal offense.  But, even lying to your own attorney is not a good idea.  It can jeopardize the whole case.  Prosecutors handle thousands of traffic tickets every year.  A lot of the defendants proclaim their innocence before the prosecutor that later prove to be guilty.  Prosecutor may therefore be skeptical if you proclaim your innocence – even if you truly are.  And, if you tell your own attorney something that he or she relied upon when discussing your case with the prosecutor and the prosecutor is able to disprove it, the chances of getting the traffic ticket dismissed by the state become slim to none.  Even if it is only a minor fact, the prosecutor may be reluctant to hear anymore of  your side of the story and just assume that nothing about your side of the story is true.

Go to Court

You must go to court in order to fight a traffic ticket in NJ.  In New Jersey, traffic infractions are handled in municipal court.  In court, you will be able to plead your innocence while conferencing the case with the prosecutor.  The conference may result in a plea agreement that downgrades the offense.  If that fails, you will be able to take the matter before the judge at a trial.  Generally speaking, there are no jury trials for traffic tickets in New Jersey.  At trial, the burden is on the state to prove the case against you beyond a reasonable doubt.

Present Evidence

Any evidence of your innocence is obviously necessary to present to your own attorney and may be necessary to present to the prosecutor and the judge.  For example, if the traffic ticket states the name of the defendant as “John A. Smith” and your name is “John B. Smith” and the address on the ticket is incorrect and/or the birth date, then you would want to bring your driver’s license with you to court to prove that the wrong person was issued the traffic summons.

The Sloan Law Firm handles traffic ticket cases in Union County, Middlesex County, Morris County, Somerset County and throughout New Jersey.  If you have received a traffic ticket in New Jersey that you are interested in fighting, you can reach the Sloan Law Firm at (908) 358-2938.  The initial consultation is always free.

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Discussion: Understanding Your Auto Policy – June 30

CRANFORD – You got a car. You got auto insurance. The auto insurance company sent you a packet of fine print. You are covered. Great! But, what does it all mean?

Attorney Daniel Sloan of The Sloan Law Firm in Cranford, New Jersey has been reading and interpreting auto insurance policies for the past ten years in his capacity as a New Jersey personal injury lawyer. The Sloan Law Firm will be presenting a free discussion on June 30 at 10:00 a.m. at the Cranford Community Center Facility located at 220 Walnut Avenue.

Discussion topics include:

• Understanding the Declaration Page
• The Limitation on Lawsuit Threshold
• Overview of PIP Coverage
• BI vs. UM/UIM Coverage

Free Admission. All are welcome. However, space is limited to the first 50 people.

For more information, please call (908) 358-2938 or email dsloan@sloanlawfirmnj.com.

 

 

***Disclaimer: Attendance does not establish an attorney-client relationship. The discussion is for informational and/or educational purposes only. Nothing offered at the discussion is intended as legal advice. Do not rely upon any information presented on the discussion as a substitute for legal or other professional advice. If you have a specific question regarding a particular legal issue, it is important to personally consult an attorney.

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Guide to Municipal Court: Union County NJ Edition

Watchung NJ Speeding Ticket Lawyer

Guide to Municipal Court: Union County NJ Edition

What is a Union County Municipal Court?

Before discussing the Union County Municipal Court system, it is important to understand New Jersey’s court system as a whole.  In New Jersey, the state court system is broken into different parts.  The New Jersey Supreme Court is the highest court in New Jersey.  The New Jersey Supreme Court generally handles appeals from a New Jersey Appellate Court.  New Jersey’s Appellate Courts are the second highest courts.  The Appellate Division usually handles appeals from a New Jersey Superior Court.  Every county in New Jersey has its own Superior Court.  Superior Courts handle a variety of matters.

The lowest court in New Jersey is the Municipal Court, sometimes referred to as traffic court.  Every town in Union County has its own Municipal Court.  Municipal Courts handle matters such as traffic tickets (including DUI), town ordinance violations and disorderly persons offenses.  Disorderly persons offenses are sometimes referred to as misdemeanors.

What Types of Criminal Offenses Are Handled in a Union County Municipal Court?

Disorderly persons offenses include:

  • Shoplifting
  • Simple Assault
  • Harassment
  • Marijuana Possession
  • Drug Paraphernalia
  • Disorderly Conduct
  • Underage Drinking
  • Public Intoxication
  • Loitering
  • Destruction of Property
  • Resisting Arrest

Many municipal courts have court only once a week.  When people go to court, there is usually a full calendar.  Busier towns have court more than once a week.  There is no set rule for how many times a municipal court must meet.

Who Works in Municipal Courts?

In any court session, you will certainly see the municipal court judge.  Municipal Court judges are usually appointed by the town mayor, which is why the municipal court judge changes from time to time.  It does not mean that the municipal court judge is doing a bad job.  Most of the time, it has to do with politics.

Aside from the judge, you may see the town prosecutor.  Because of the heavy caseload, the prosecutor is usually in his or her office negotiating plea agreements with various defendants.  Occasionally, the judge will require an explanation from the prosecutor as to a particular plea agreement and then the prosecutor will appear.  The prosecutor will also be there for any trial.

Every town has one or more public defenders as well.  In Union County municipal courts, public defenders are available to those that are charged with a criminal offense or serious traffic infraction.  In addition, the defendant must qualify financially.  If you qualify for the public defender, the cost is $200. Like the prosecutor, public defenders usually have very heavy caseloads as well.

Usually, you will also see private criminal defense attorneys.  Unlike the public defender, the private criminal defense lawyer is usually there on behalf of one client.  His or her time and efforts are devoted completely towards one client.  Private attorney cases are usually handled first.

Aside from the lawyers, you will probably also notice:

  • Court administrators
  • Court clerks
  • Police officers
  •  Interpreters
  • Violation bureau clerks

How Does a Municipal Court Session Work?

It is really up to the judge to determine how he or she wants to handle the court session.  Generally speaking, first appearances are handled first because they take the least amount of time.  First appearances are for defendants to hear the charges against them and to enter an initial plea of guilty or not guilty.  You may hear on the cable news about a not guilty plea from a defendant that appears to be obviously guilty.  It is important to point out that this is an initial plea and a not guilty plea is often entered initially so that the defendant can obtain a lawyer.  Judges are very reluctant to put through a guilty plea without a lawyer present for the defendant.  After you enter your first appearance in municipal court, the court will schedule your case for either a trial or a conference.  Whether the matter is listed for trial or a conference usually depends on the nature of the charge.

After first appearances are out of the way, the judge will typically take plea agreements.  Plea agreements are relatively quick but usually take longer than first appearances.  Plea agreements are generally the result of a conference between the prosecutor and the criminal defense attorney.

Trials are always handled last.  They take the most amount of time.  Handling trials last allows the judge to get through everyone else’s case so that they are not waiting around for the trial to end just to enter a not guilty plea or put through a plea agreement.

I Got a Ticket, Where is the Municipal Court Located?

For the most part, the town in which you received the traffic ticket or summons is the town that will handle the court case.  Below is a complete list of Union County Municipal Courts.  Click on the court name to go directly to the municipal court’s website.

Berkeley Heights Municipal Court

360 Elkwood Avenue
New Providence, NJ 07974
Phone: (908) 665-1454/ (908) 743-1055
(In January 2018 the court office will be relocated and court sessions will be held in the City of Summit, located at 512 Springfield Avenue. This is due to renovations to the office and court room here in New Providence. The renovations are expected to last until May 2018.)

Clark Municipal Court

315 Westfield Avenue
Clark, NJ 07066
Phone: (732) 381-5395

Cranford Municipal Court

8 Springfield Avenue
Cranford, NJ 07016
Phone: (908) 709-7242

Elizabeth Municipal Court

One Police Plaza (between Commerce Place & East Grand Street)
Elizabeth, NJ 07201
Phone: (908) 558-6800

Fanwood Municipal Court

75 North Martine Ave,
Fanwood, NJ 07023
Phone: (908) 322-8236

Garwood Municipal Court

403 South Avenue
Garwood, NJ 07027
Phone: (908) 789-0780

Hillside Municipal Court

1409 Liberty Avenue
Hillside, NJ 07205
Phone: (973) 926-1881

Kenilworth Municipal Court

567 Boulevard
Kenilworth, NJ 07033
Phone: (908) 276-1104

Linden Municipal Court

301 North Wood Avenue
Linden, NJ 07036
Phone: (908) 474-8429

Mountainside Municipal Court

1385 U.S. Highway 22 East
Mountainside, NJ 07092
Phone: (908) 232-5335

New Providence Municipal Court

360 Elkwood Avenue
New Providence, NJ 07974
Phone: (908) 665-1454

Plainfield Municipal Court

325 Watchung Ave
Plainfield, NJ 07060
Phone: (908) 753-3064

Rahway Municipal Court

1 City Hall Plaza
Rahway, NJ 07065
Phone: (732) 827-2039

Roselle Municipal Court

210 Chestnut Street
Roselle, NJ 07203
Phone: (908) 245-5588

Roselle Park Municipal Court

110 East Westfield Avenue
Roselle Park, NJ 07204
Phone: (908) 241-4631

Scotch Plains Municipal Court

430 Park Avenue
Scotch Plains, NJ 07076
Phone: (908) 322-6700

Springfield Municipal Court

100 Mountain Avenue
Springfield, NJ 07081
Phone: (973) 912-2213

Summit Municipal Court

512 Springfield Avenue
Summit, NJ 07901
Phone: 908-273-6112

Union Municipal Court

981 Caldwell Avenue
Union, NJ 07083
Phone: (908) 851-5400

Westfield Municipal Court

425 East Broad Street
Westfield, NJ 07090
Phone: (908) 789-4060

Winfield Municipal Court

12 Gulfstream Avenue
Winfield, NJ 07036
Phone: (908) 925-3852

Can I Pay My Traffic Ticket Online?

Parking tickets and some traffic tickets can be paid online.  Some traffic tickets require a court appearance.  The ticket usually has a box checked off that will notify you as to whether or not a court appearance is required.

Pay Your Traffic Ticket Online Here

Union County NJ Criminal Defense Lawyer – (908) 358-2938

The Sloan Law Firm aggressively defends clients dealing with criminal charges and traffic infractions in every Union County municipal court and throughout New Jersey. If you have received a summons for a traffic ticket or a criminal offense and would like to speak with a Union County NJ Municipal Court Attorney, call (908) 358-2938.  The initial consultation is free.

The firm serves clients in: Berkeley Heights, Clark, Cranford, Garwood, Fanwood, Elizabeth, Hillside, Linden, Kenilworth, Mountainside, New Providence, Plainfield, Rahway, Roselle, Roselle Park, Springfield, Summit, Scotch Plains, Union, Westfield, Winfield and throughout Union County.

Thank you for reading.

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Initial NJ Auto Accident Injury Lawyer Consult: What to Bring

NJ Injury Attorney Consultation

Initial NJ Auto Accident Injury With Lawyer Consult: What to Bring

You have been injured in an auto accident in New Jersey.  You have asked around and found a few personal injury lawyers in the area.  You looked online to see the reviews of these personal injury lawyers and have selected one that you would like to consult with regarding your auto accident.  What should you bring to the initial consultation?

  • Declaration Page: It is very important to bring the declaration page from your auto insurance policy.  This will allow the New Jersey personal injury lawyer that you have selected to advise you on a number of things.  First, the personal injury lawyer will be able to tell you whether you have selected the limitation on lawsuit threshold.  The limitation on lawsuit threshold prevents those injured an auto accident from filing a lawsuit unless the injury falls into one of six categories.  These include: death, dismemberment, significant scarring, loss of a fetus, displaced fracture or permanent injury.  In addition to being able to identify whether the limitation on lawsuit threshold is applicable, the personal injury attorney will be able to advise you as to your coverage limits for medical bills and the amount potentially available to you should the other vehicle involved in the crash be uninsured.
  • Property Damages Photos: Pictures of your car following the accident are very important as well.  It gives the personal injury lawyer some perspective on how the accident happened.  It also allows the personal injury attorney to evaluate the nature and force of the impact.
  • Health Insurance Cards:  Whether you have Medicare, Medicaid, HMO,  or a PPO, it is important to bring your health insurance cards with you to the initial meeting.  Although your auto insurance company is primarily responsible for your medical bills, your health insurer may have already paid some of your medical expenses such as the hospital bill.  If Medicare or Medicaid paid medical bills related to the accident, they will want the money back from the driver that caused the crash.  This is true for some health insurance companies as well.
  • Police Report:  The police report is single most important document in any auto accident case.  The police report may be mailed to you or you may need to pick it up at the police station.  This is perhaps the most important document in any car accident case because it identifies the parties involved in the accident.  It identifies who claimed injury at the scene.  It provides a diagram as to how the accident happened.  It provides the auto insurance information for all of the vehicles involved in the accident.  If the police report is in your possession at the time of the initial consultation, it is extremely helpful to have for the initial consultation.
  • Medical Bills: Bringing the medical bills with you to the initial consultation accomplishes two things.  First, it allows your attorney to see whether it was paid and by whom.  In addition, it allows you attorney to see the name  and address of the doctor or medical facility that you have been treating with.

Any other documentation that you can find is important to bring with you as well but the materials listed above are the most important in any motor vehicle accident case.

The Sloan Law Firm handles auto accident cases in Union County, Morris County, Somerset County, Middlesex County, Essex County and throughout New Jersey.  If you have been injured in a New Jersey auto accident and would to speak with a New Jersey Personal Injury Attorney, call (908) 358-2938.  The initial consultation is always free.

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Shoplifting in New Jersey – Different From Other Misdemeanors

New Jersey Shoplifting Lawyer

Shoplifting in New Jersey – Different From Other Misdemeanors

Shopping is very popular in New Jersey.  It is so popular that residents from other states are bussed into New Jersey just to visit malls like Jersey Gardens, Short Hills Mall, Menlo Park, Woodbridge Center, Willowbrook Mall and Westfield Garden Plaza. Unfortunately, anywhere there is shopping, there is shoplifting.

Where Are Shoplifting Charges Handled In New Jersey?

In addition to traffic tickets, Municipal Courts throughout New Jersey handle a variety of disorderly and petty disorderly offenses – sometimes referred to as misdemeanors.  Disorderly persons offenses include things like marijuana possession, harassment, simple assault, drug paraphernalia, disorderly conduct, underage drinking and shoplifting in New Jersey.

The penalty for a standard disorderly persons first offense is a $1,000 fine (maximum) and up to six (6) months in jail.  The penalty for the typical petty disorderly persons offense is a $500 fine (maximum) and up to thirty (30) days in jail.  There is a loss of license for some of the drug offenses as well.

Although they have the discretion, most municipal court judges are reluctant to put an individual in jail for either a disorderly or petty disorderly persons offense conviction especially if it is a first offense.  Usually, jail is reserved for repeat offenders.  Most of the time a person convicted of a misdemeanor in municipal court is issued a fine and possibly probation.

New Jersey Shoplifting Attorney

How Is Shoplifting Different From Other Misdemeanors?

For shoplifting convictions, a municipal court judge’s hands are tied.  The New Jersey Legislature removed the municipal court’s discretion for certain shoplifting convictions.  Anyone convicted of a third or subsequent offense for shoplifting is subject to a mandatory ninety (90) days in jail.  So, if you, for example, removed a shopping cart from a store’s premises and the police believed you did so to permanently deprive the store owner of it and you had two prior shoplifting convictions on your record, you are going to jail if you are convicted.  The judge has no discretion.

The prospect of going to jail for a municipal court offense is not a very nice thought.  Anyone charged with shoplifting in New Jersey should consult with a criminal defense attorney even if it is not the third offense.  You do not want any shoplifting convictions on your record because you may one day be falsely accused of shoplifting with the possibility of facing three months in jail.

NJ Shoplifting Lawyer

The Sloan Law Firm handles shoplifting offenses throughout New Jersey.  The firm will force the store to produce video evidence of the alleged shoplifting; otherwise, a motion to dismiss the case may be filed on behalf of the client.  If you or a loved one are facing shoplifting charges, it is important to discuss your case with a New Jersey Shoplifting Lawyer.  The Sloan Law Firm is available for consultation about any shoplifting matter at: (908) 358-2938.

NJ Shoplifting Attorney

New Jersey Shoplifting Laws and Statute

a. Definitions. The following definitions apply to this section:

“Shopping cart” means those push carts of the type or types which are commonly provided by grocery stores, drug stores or other retail mercantile establishments for the use of the public in transporting commodities in stores and markets and, incidentally, from the stores to a place outside the store;

“Store or other retail mercantile establishment” means a place where merchandise is displayed, held, stored or sold or offered to the public for sale;

“Merchandise” means any goods, chattels, foodstuffs or wares of any type and description, regardless of the value thereof;

“Merchant” means any owner or operator of any store or other retail mercantile establishment, or any agent, servant, employee, lessee, consignee, officer, director, franchisee or independent contractor of such owner or proprietor;

“Person” means any individual or individuals, including an agent, servant or employee of a merchant where the facts of the situation so require;

“Conceal” means to conceal merchandise so that, although there may be some notice of its presence, it is not visible through ordinary observation;

“Full retail value” means the merchant’s stated or advertised price of the merchandise;

“Premises of a store or retail mercantile establishment” means and includes but is not limited to, the retail mercantile establishment; any common use areas in shopping centers and all parking areas set aside by a merchant or on behalf of a merchant for the parking of vehicles for the convenience of the patrons of such retail mercantile establishment;

“Under-ring” means to cause the cash register or other sale recording device to reflect less than the full retail value of the merchandise;

“Antishoplifting or inventory control device countermeasure” means any item or device which is designed, manufactured, modified, or altered to defeat any antishoplifting or inventory control device;

“Organized retail theft enterprise” means any association of two or more persons who engage in the conduct of or are associated for the purpose of effectuating the transfer or sale of shoplifted merchandise.

b. Shoplifting. Shoplifting shall consist of any one or more of the following acts:

For any person purposely to take possession of, carry away, transfer or cause to be carried away or transferred, any merchandise displayed, held, stored or offered for sale by any store or other retail mercantile establishment with the intention of depriving the merchant of the possession, use or benefit of such merchandise or converting the same to the use of such person without paying to the merchant the full retail value thereof.

For any person purposely to conceal upon his person or otherwise any merchandise offered for sale by any store or other retail mercantile establishment with the intention of depriving the merchant of the processes, use or benefit of such merchandise or converting the same to the use of such person without paying to the merchant the value thereof.

For any person purposely to alter, transfer or remove any label, price tag or marking indicia of value or any other markings which aid in determining value affixed to any merchandise displayed, held, stored or offered for sale by any store or other retail mercantile establishment and to attempt to purchase such merchandise personally or in consort with another at less than the full retail value with the intention of depriving the merchant of all or some part of the value thereof.

For any person purposely to transfer any merchandise displayed, held, stored or offered for sale by any store or other retail merchandise establishment from the container in or on which the same shall be displayed to any other container with intent to deprive the merchant of all or some part of the retail value thereof.

For any person purposely to under-ring with the intention of depriving the merchant of the full retail value thereof.

For any person purposely to remove a shopping cart from the premises of a store or other retail mercantile establishment without the consent of the merchant given at the time of such removal with the intention of permanently depriving the merchant of the possession, use or benefit of such cart.

c. Gradation.

Shoplifting constitutes a crime of the second degree under subsection b. of this section if the full retail value of the merchandise is $75,000 or more, or the offense is committed in furtherance of or in conjunction with an organized retail theft enterprise and the full retail value of the merchandise is $1,000 or more.

Shoplifting constitutes a crime of the third degree under subsection b. of this section if the full retail value of the merchandise exceeds $500 but is less than $75,000, or the offense is committed in furtherance of or in conjunction with an organized retail theft enterprise and the full retail value of the merchandise is less than $1,000.

Shoplifting constitutes a crime of the fourth degree under subsection b. of this section if the full retail value of the merchandise is at least $200 but does not exceed $500.

Shoplifting is a disorderly persons offense under subsection b. of this section if the full retail value of the merchandise is less than $200.

The value of the merchandise involved in a violation of this section may be aggregated in determining the grade of the offense where the acts or conduct constituting a violation were committed pursuant to one scheme or course of conduct, whether from the same person or several persons, or were committed in furtherance of or in conjunction with an organized retail theft enterprise.

Additionally, notwithstanding the term of imprisonment provided in N.J.S.2C:43-6 or 2C:43-8, any person convicted of a shoplifting offense shall be sentenced to perform community service as follows: for a first offense, at least ten days of community service; for a second offense, at least 15 days of community service; and for a third or subsequent offense, a maximum of 25 days of community service and any person convicted of a third or subsequent shoplifting offense shall serve a minimum term of imprisonment of not less than 90 days.

d. Presumptions. Any person purposely concealing unpurchased merchandise of any store or other retail mercantile establishment, either on the premises or outside the premises of such store or other retail mercantile establishment, shall be prima facie presumed to have so concealed such merchandise with the intention of depriving the merchant of the possession, use or benefit of such merchandise without paying the full retail value thereof, and the finding of such merchandise concealed upon the person or among the belongings of such person shall be prima facie evidence of purposeful concealment; and if such person conceals, or causes to be concealed, such merchandise upon the person or among the belongings of another, the finding of the same shall also be prima facie evidence of willful concealment on the part of the person so concealing such merchandise.

e. A law enforcement officer, or a special officer, or a merchant, who has probable cause for believing that a person has willfully concealed unpurchased merchandise and that he can recover the merchandise by taking the person into custody, may, for the purpose of attempting to effect recovery thereof, take the person into custody and detain him in a reasonable manner for not more than a reasonable time, and the taking into custody by a law enforcement officer or special officer or merchant shall not render such person criminally or civilly liable in any manner or to any extent whatsoever.

Any law enforcement officer may arrest without warrant any person he has probable cause for believing has committed the offense of shoplifting as defined in this section.

A merchant who causes the arrest of a person for shoplifting, as provided for in this section, shall not be criminally or civilly liable in any manner or to any extent whatsoever where the merchant has probable cause for believing that the person arrested committed the offense of shoplifting.

f. Any person who possesses or uses any anti-shoplifting or inventory control device countermeasure within any store or other retail mercantile establishment is guilty of a disorderly persons offens

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Injured in a NJ Auto Accident-How Does an Car Accident Lawsuit Work?

New Jersey Car Accident Lawyer

Injured in a NJ Auto Accident-How Does an Car Accident Lawsuit Work?

For those injured in a car accident in New Jersey, it is important to consult with a New Jersey Personal Injury Attorney as soon as possible.  Most NJ personal injury lawyers will provide a free initial consultation and work on a contingency fee basis so there is really no downside to consulting with one.  It will give you an opportunity to review your rights and responsibilities.

THE ACCIDENT SCENE

As soon as an auto accident occurs, word of the accident spreads pretty quickly.  Generally, the police find out immediately as someone calls them from the scene.  Later, a police report is generated and made available to the public.  If there are injuries reported to the police at the scene, the police will call an ambulance to take those injured to the hospital unless they refuse treatment.  Those requiring an ambulance and a hospital visit often forget that auto insurance is the primary insurer in NJ for the medical bills incurred from the accident unless health insurance was previously chosen as primary on the insurance application.

Car Accident Lawyer NJ

INJURED IN A NJ ACCIDENT

For those that elect to obtain the services of a personal injury attorney in NJ, the lawyer and the client will enter into a retainer agreement.  The attorney will usually work on a contingency fee basis under the retainer agreement.  This means that the client pays nothing up front.  The lawyer will take his or her fee at the end of the case out of any recovery.

Car Accident Lawyer NJ

LIMITATION ON LAWSUIT THRESHOLD

Most New Jersey residents have a limitation on lawsuit threshold on their auto insurance policy.  A limitation on lawsuit threshold prevents those injured in a car accident from filing a lawsuit against the party that caused it unless they fall into one of six exceptions:

  1. Death
  2. Dismemberment
  3. Significant Disfigurement or Scarring
  4. Displaced fracture
  5. Loss of a Fetus
  6. Permanent Injury (an injury to a body part that has not and will not healed to function normally)

THE PERSONAL INJURY LAWSUIT

After signing up with a NJ Personal Injury Attorney, the lawyer will have to collect the client’s medical records and review the law to determine whether there is a case.  This is based upon the lawyer’s opinion and many times lawyers disagree.  Assuming there is a case, the lawyer will file a Complaint on behalf of the client.  It is then incumbent upon the defendant to file an Answer.  The discovery period begins as well.  Discovery is the period in which the plaintiff and the defendant exchange information.  In a car accident case, this generally involves exchanging medical records, answering written questions, answering oral questions at a deposition and undergoing medical examinations.  The discovery period can take over a year to complete.

ARBITRATION

Once discovery is over, the matter will go to arbitration.  Arbitration is like a mini-trial before an arbitrator.  An arbitrator is an experienced lawyer in the community with no connection to the case who is selected at random to review it.  Witnesses can testify before the arbitrator.  Medical records are reviewed by the arbitrator.  A decision will then be made by the arbitrator as to how much the case is worth.

Car Accident Attorney NJ

THE TRIAL

Arbitration in non-binding and, therefore, either party can reject the arbitrator’s decision.  If either party rejects the arbitrator’s decision, the matter will be listed for trial.  Most trials for car accident cases are over within a week.  At trial, witnesses such as the plaintiff, the defendant, the medical doctors, witnesses of the accident, experts, etc…are called to testify.  The lawyers for the plaintiff and the defendant will give opening and closing statements as well.  Following the closing statements, the jury will then decide the issues.  In a car accident case, the issues generally pertain to who was at fault for the accident, whether the plaintiff’s injures met the limitation on lawsuit threshold and how much to award in compensation.

So, when does the car accident case settle?

A car accident case can settle at any moment during this entire process.  There are many, many factors that go into when and whether the case settles.  Unfortunately, it varies on a case-by-case basis.  Sometimes, it doesn’t settle and a trial is necessary.

NJ PERSONAL INJURY LAWYER – THE SLOAN LAW FIRM

(908) 358-2938

If you have been injured in a NJ car accident, it is a good idea to discuss the matter with a NJ Personal Injury Lawyer.  The Sloan Law Firm handles auto accident cases throughout New Jersey and can be reached at (908) 358-2938 to discuss any matter.  Thank for reading.

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Understanding Your Auto Insurance Policy After a NJ Car Accident Injury

Car Accident Lawyer New Jersey

Injured in a Car Accident in NJ? Understanding Your Auto Insurance Policy

After a car accident in New Jersey, people often find themselves digging around the house to find their auto insurance policy.   Auto insurers issue what is called a Declaration Page with the policy.  Everyone understands collision coverage limits and the deductible associated with it.   But, what are these other acronyms?  BI? UM/UIM? PIP?

Bodily Injury Coverage

“BI” stands for Bodily Injury coverage.  This coverage is there to protect you in the event that you are sued by others for causing bodily injury in a car accident.  The dollar amount next to it represents your coverage limits.  Generally, there are two amounts listed.  The first amount represents the amount of BI coverage you have for each person that may sue you.  The second number is the amount you have for each accident.

So, let’s assume I got into a car accident in Cranford, N.J. In the other car, there are three people – 1 driver and 2 passengers.  Let’s also assume that next to the BI coverage, I had limits of 15/30.  If one of the people in the other car sued me, the most insurance coverage I would have would be $15,000.00.  If all three of the people sued me, the most insurance coverage I would have would be $30,000.00.  At this point, I may have a problem.  An experienced personal injury lawyer in Cranford, N.J. may come after my house on behalf of his or her client.

Uninsured/Underinsured Motorists Coverage

“UM/UIM” stands for uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage.  This coverage is there to protect you in the event that you are injured in a car accident through no fault of your own and the driver responsible has no insurance or limited insurance.  Uninsured motorist coverage is pretty easy to understand.   Assuming, again, that I got into a car accident in Cranford, N.J., but this time it was not my fault.  However, the other driver had no insurance.  Let’s assume, again, I look to my declaration page and see 15/30.   The maximum amount that my auto insurance company would possibly reimburse me for my injuries (not including medical expenses) is $15,000.00.

Underinsured motorist or “UIM” coverage is a little trickier.  The concept is easy.  The other car had limited insurance so my insurance picks up where the other driver’s left off.  In practice, “UIM” coverage only comes into effect when the driver responsible for the accident had more coverage.  So, if both drivers in an accident have 15/30 in “UM/UIM” coverage, there is no underinsured motorist (“UIM”) coverage available to the injured driver not at fault.  The driver responsible has to have more.  The insurance company is only responsible for the difference.

Personal Injury Protection Coverage

“PIP” refers to Personal Injury Protection.  This coverage is there to pay your medical bills in the event that you are injured in a NJ car accident.  The coverage amounts available for this coverage range from $15,000.00 to $250,000.00.  PIP is available to you regardless of whether or not you are at fault for the accident.  New Jersey is a no-fault state when it comes to coverage for your medical expenses.  It is also becomes primary when you are involved in a motor vehicle accident unless you select “health primary” on your auto policy application instead.

If you are ever hurt in a car accident in Cranford or anywhere in New Jersey, it is sometimes necessary to immediately consult with an experienced Personal Injury NJ Lawyer.  Attorney Daniel Sloan has many years of experience handling NJ personal injury cases.  If you have been injured in a New Jersey car accident and would like a free consultation to explore your legal options, you can reach the Sloan Law Firm at (908) 358-2938.  Thank you for reading.